Traps and Treasure

Traps and Treasure is finally out! With a lot of consternation for the title and a lot of fighting me in the creative process, it’s finally a finished product! It’s a multiplayer strategy game focused on balancing risk versus reward that only requires the rules and a deck of playing cards to get started!

In case you couldn’t tell, this project really fought me. I’m a big adherent of the design mentality that the subtlety of a design has to be worth the complexity of implementing it, and it led the ousting of several design features that I had initially considered integral, namely the point system. Once I started cutting elements, the game started to properly come together.

I’m proud to present Traps and Treasure!

Click the links located below to download the pdf files for Traps and Treasure, one of which is a readme.

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Synergist

Week three of the this game project, and I’m very glad it’s done. I enjoyed working on it, but it was an incredible amount of work. I’d like to introduce Synergist, the 1v1 competitive match-three game!

This game was more ambitious than I planned it to be. Designing it was supposed to be as simple as actually playing a match-three game, but I got a bit overzealous. I originally wanted to include only a singular ability for each class, but ended up providing each one with three abilities, one passive and two active.

The part where I struggled the most was balanced, and I’m not sure that it’s even at the right point. One thing other match-three games never have to worry about is balance, because they’re all single player. At the end of the day, the game doesn’t have to be balanced to be fun to play. However, it was a big issue for Synergist. How many tokens do I have in the deck? How many unique abilities can I create? How balanced are each of the classes against each other? I couldn’t answer all the questions that I had to a satisfactory point and just conceded to finish the game as it was. I think I was at the point where even playing it more wouldn’t have helped me come to a proper conclusion.

I’m really pleased by how it turned out regardless of balance though. It’s one of the higher effort games I’ve worked on in quite a while, from the balance to the graphics department, and I rose to my expectations on all accounts. It explores what I consider to be unfulfilled niche in the match-three world and I’m extremely proud of it as both a project and a product.

I’m proud to present Synergist!

Click the links located below to download the pdf files for Synergist, one of which is a readme.

If you enjoy our content, please like, share, subscribe, please visit us on our social media, and check out the rest of our projects! Every little bit helps and we’d love for our content to be able to reach more people!

Tangled Web

Tangled Web is a pen and paper game that’s relatively simple. It follows Snake’s elements of not crossing certain areas and Pac-man’s mechanic of going across the board via the outside, with a hexagonal board.

Located below is the file for Tangled Web.

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Placeholder

Yes, that’s the actual name of the game. I willingly chose it during the design process because I feel it fits the game.

I actually really love the simplicity of this game. The entire document isn’t even 10 sentences long. Most of the design practice here was a ton of playtesting. When a game has rules as simple as this one does, any number of things can go wrong, such as being completely unable to win the game depending on your first move, which was actually a problem at some points of the design process.

I look at it as one of those game theory heavy type games that mathematicians like doing papers on, ridiculously simple but a lot of options that spawn from it. It’s designed for two players and requires a 4×4 board, which you can draw yourself, and nine tokens per player. If you’re looking for an easy game that has relatively high depth, give Placeholder a try.

Located below is the pdf file for Placeholder.

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Duelist’s Wager

Sorry that this game is a week late, but life happens sometimes. Expect to see the normal game this upcoming Sunday though. I’m also rewriting the Luckbinder, because it was dreadfully weak, so that should be out soon as well.

I’ve had this game idea for a while; ever since I wrote Powerdome, I’ve had an obsession with ability-based bluff games, and this was one of the concepts I wanted to try. Drafting characters with special abilities in order to create interplay between both choosing them and empowering them later on was the basic idea. I think it went pretty well all things considered. The character tokens and Boost system are quite elegant in my eyes.

The hardest part of this game was coming up with character abilities that had three qualities: ability to influence how you play your Boosts, ability for your opponent to predict how you’ll play your boosts, and different functionality from the other characters.

Duelist’s Wager is a bluffing game that focuses on your ability to outplay your opponent. With elements of prediction and strategy in both choosing which characters you bring to the fight and how well you’ll equip them to win with your limited resources, you’ll be sure to enjoy how much you can really get into your opponent’s head. It’s designed for two players to fight each other in a duel of pure wits, and with each game only taking around ten minutes, you’ll be able to fit in that “just one more” game in order even out the score.

Located below are the pdf files for Duelist’s Wager, one of which is a readme.

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PowerDome

Come watch the ongoing bout!

Two, battle-worn combatants fight fiercely, clashing their swords in a contest of strength and skill. They match each other blow for blow, shaking the earth as each one struggles to gain the upper hand. One of the fighters begins to falter, but he steadies himself and seems to whisper something, pointing his sword at his opponent. A lance of flame launches from it, searing a hole through the chest of his opponent. His opponent falls dead before him, Though he falls to his knees from exhaustion, he still screams his victory to the skies. He’s won.

Prepare to see all this and more! Welcome to the PowerDome!

PowerDome is a role-playing game in which you gain abilities through auction, create a character around those powers, and fight other players to the death. It’s designed for 2 players or more and takes roughly thirty minutes to play.

Located below are the pdf files for PowerDome, one of which is a readme.

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Scrapped

The life of a robot in a land of scrap shouldn’t be an especially hard one, but, when there are other robots taking all the good stuff, it’s certainly not easy. Luckily, you’ll get the opportunity to fight them off in Scrapped.

Scrapped is a role-playing game in which you play as a modular robot combating other robots in a scrap heap and trying to stay powered. It‘s designed for 2-4 players and takes roughly twenty minutes to play.

Located below is a .zip containing the files for Scrapped, or there would be if WordPress would let me post one. Instead, there’s four PDFs, one of which is a readme.

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